2020 Impact factor 1.890
Soft Matter and Biological Physics


Eur. Phys. J. E 7, 311-315 (2002)
DOI: 10.1140/epje/i2001-10099-1

The transition from two-dimensional to three-dimensional foam structures

S.J. Cox1, D. Weaire1 and M. Fátima Vaz2

1  Department of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2, Ireland
2  ICEMS, Instituto de Ciência e Engenharia de Materiais e Superfícies, Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais, Instituto Superior Técnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1096 Lisboa Codex, Portugal

simon.cox@tcd.ie

(Received 15 October 2001 and Received in final form 14 January 2002)

Abstract
Small cells in an experimental sample of two-dimensional foam, such as that which is contained between two glass plates, may undergo a transition to a three-dimensional form, becoming detached from one boundary. We present the first detailed observations of this phenomenon, together with computer simulations. The transition is attributed to an instability of the Rayleigh-Plateau type. A theoretical analysis is given which shows that an individual cell is susceptible to this instability only if it has less than six sides.

PACS
47.20.Dr - Surface-tension-driven instability.
82.70.Rr - Aerosols and foams.


© EDP Sciences, Società Italiana di Fisica, Springer-Verlag 2002